About me

About my pencil/charcoal art

About my color work

About me

Professional artist, Alan Reeve currently works as a character design artist for Promo Costumes located in Marion, Ohio. Prior to this, Reeve was the Art Chair/Teacher at Marion Catholic High School in Marion, Ohio, for fifteen years until it abruptly closed in 2013. During his tenure, Reeve taught a multitude of disciplines including: drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, computer graphics, photography, and photojournalism. Recognized in Who’s Who of American Teachers, his knowledge and passion for teaching led many of his students to further their education in art.

Described by his peers as one of the top 20% of working artist in America today, Reeve is an incredibly diversified and awarded artist. He is as adept at realistic drawing and sculpture as he is illustrating a comical cartoon. Hes created comics, portraits, business logos, signs, and even does matting and framing. His work is collected and treasured throughout the world, including works owned by such notable people as Vice President of The United States, Joe Biden, and jazz musician Arnett Howard.

Reeve received his Bachelors of Fine Arts from Kent State University. Currently, he is busy working on a series of celebrity caricature sculpture reliefs that can be hung on the wall. He resides in Marion with his lovely wife, Jennifer.

 

Selected Exhibitions:

 

2015 It's Saturday Morning Somewhere, invited artist, The Vanderelli Room Gallery, Columbus, Ohio

2014 Hail to the King, Rehab Tavern Columbus, Ohio

2014 Fear Hundred 4 @400Rich Street Columbus, Ohio

2014 Selected participant of Artists of Ohio (AAAO) Inaugural Show, Tacocat Gallery, Columbus, Ohio

2014 The Erotic Art Show Zanesville, Ohio

2013 Fear Hundred 3 @400Rich Street Columbus, Ohio

2013 CS Gallery Group Show, Peoples Choice Award, Columbus, Ohio

2013 The Birthday Suit Show @the Roscoe Room, Columbus, Ohio

2012 The Cornucopia Show @the Roscoe Room, Columbus, Ohio

2011 The Delaware Arts Castle, Delaware, Ohio

2010 The Art Pad, Clintonville, Ohio

2009 DaVic Art Studio, Columbus, Ohio

2009 High Roads Gallery, BOS Award, Colored Pencil Exhibit

2007 Jung Association Gallery, Short North art district, Columbus, Ohio

2007-Present Main Street Gallery, Mount Vernon, Ohio

2006 Kuhn Gallery, One Man Show, Marion, Ohio

2005 Ohio Art League, Raw Materials, Columbus, Ohio

2005 Kuhn Gallery The Ohio State University, Marion, Ohio

2004 Holidayfest Short North Columbus, Ohio

2004 Studio 16 Gallery, Columbus, Ohio

2003 Ohio Art Teachers Show, BOS Award, Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio

2003 Mean Bean Coffee Lounge, One Man Show, Delaware, Ohio

1996-1999 Celebrate Summer Art Fair, 1996 BOS Award, The Ohio State University Campus at Marion

1996 Estate of the Arts Gallery, Mansfield, Ohio



Selected Awards:

Roscoe People's Choice Award, 2013 CS Gallery June Group Show

Best of Show, 2009 High Roads Gallery, Colored Pencil Exhibit

Best of Show, 2005 The First Annual Juried Community Art Exhibition, Kuhn Gallery Ohio State University

Best of Show, 2003 Ohio Art Educators Exhibit, Marietta, Ohio

Best of Show, 1997 Celebrate Summer Art Fair

1997 Finalist Portrait Category/Honorable Mention, The Artist’s Magazine


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About my pencil/charcoal art

I am a realist. I look for an elegant clarity of form and new boundaries of realism processed through my eye. I create rich graphite and charcoal paintings. I prefer to work with simple graphite or charcoal pencils as they allow me to capture the lighting and detail without getting bogged down in the complexity of their use. Sometimes I create an introspective narrative, portraying a thought or expression. Other times I just marvel in the beauty of the figure.

When I begin a drawing of the subject, there are three important goals. The first is to create an accurate drawing of the form. This is the foundation and must be done correctly. As I map out the drawing, I pay attention to the contour, the edges around the form, and the negative space, the spaces around the subject that are not the form. I use a technique I call sighting, or comparing the position of one point to another.

The second is to create a sense of the tactual. I want the viewer to be able to visually feel the art; the rough texture of an old barn, the tension of the muscles of the back, the softness of the belly, the crisp folds of a shirt, even the hardness of an elbow or kneecap. This is all very important to the success of the drawing.

The third goal is to capture the light and shadow that falls on the model. I use a technique used by Renaissance artists called chiaroscuro, interpreting the tonal values I see and using them to clarify the form. Often, in order to maintain the whole of the drawing, I will lay down an even tone, or ground, or start with a colored paper. Values are created with successive layers of tone burnished into the tooth, or texture of the paper. Sometimes I even scrub the paper with steel wool to further push the graphite into the tooth and achieve a richness of tone. Highlights are carved or cut out with a kneaded or sharp vinyl eraser, or drawn in with white chalk. I am constantly pushing and pulling tones, looking for the play of dark against light to convincingly reveal the form.


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About my color work

Sometimes people ask me, “why don’t you paint?” My response has been that I’m still learning to draw. I’ve always felt that drawing is the backbone of all art, and I continually am learning and perfecting my craft.

In 2002, I began experimenting with some drawings using Adobe Photoshop. I created a series of figure drawings inspired by the art nouveau style of one of my favorite artist, Alphonse Mucha. Using several sheets of tracing paper, I create a pencil line drawing of a figure and then ink the drawing. I then scan the ink drawing into the computer and clean them up. At this point I apply color to the drawings using several layers in Photoshop. Photoshop makes it easy to change colors to finalize the image.

I enjoyed this process so much that I have done several different types of drawings and have plans to do more in the future.



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